why do we use metric units in science

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Not only scientists rely on the metric system. Almost every government in the world has adopted it as the national system of measurement, and of the three that aren\’t committed to it, at least one в the United States в considers it the preferred system for international trade. The U. S. National Council of Teachers of Mathematics has recommended that it be the primary measurement system taught in schools.

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Unlike the British Imperial System, the metric system, or SI (from the French
SystГЕme International ), is based on a natural constant. SI is designed to make measurements and calculations easy to perform and understand, which is one of the main reasons scientists use it.

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SI is not based on the arbitrary construct of the human body; rather, on precise and definite standards. SI uses base 10, just like our number system, so it is much easier to learn, remember and convert between units. The prefixes used in SI are from Latin and Greek, and they refer to the numbers that the terms represent. (For example, \”kilo\” as in \”kilogram\” means 1 000 and \”milli\” means 1/1000).

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You can now easily calculate the number of millimeters in a kilometer. (how many inches in a mile? ) SI units are interrelated in such a way that one unit is derived from other units without conversion factors.

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E. g. Try that with the \’English\’ units. SI is used in most places around the world, so our use of it allows scientists from disparate regions to use a single standard in communicating scientific data without vocabulary confusion.

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