why do we drink water after a massage

\"\"

Massage has been in use for thousands of years. According to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, references to massage appear in writings from ancient China, Japan, India, Arabic nations, Egypt, Greece and Rome. Massage was popular in Sweden and other parts of Europe as well. Two American physicians introduced massage therapy in the United States in the 1850s. Massage became popular and is now used for a variety of health purposes. Massage therapists commonly recommend drinking water after a massage. This intent is to help the body flush out toxins. The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine says numerous theories exist about how massage therapy may affect the body. These theories include neurological connections, bio-chemical changes and other physiological mechanisms. Research has shown that massage may benefit some patients, but additional studies are needed to test the various theories and to determine how massage affects the body. According to MayoClinic. com, water is used for a variety of functions in the body, such as moistening tissues and protecting internal organs, dissolving nutrients to be absorbed by the body, lubricating joints and regulating body temperature. Water is important because it makes up about 60 percent of your body. In addition to the functions listed above, water helps the kidneys flush out waste products as well as help in oxygen transport to the cells of the body. The human body needs water on a daily basis, and the amount depends on the body composition of the individual as well as the activity level.

\"\"

According to MayoClinic. com, water is lost daily through perspiration, breathing, urine and during bowel movements. Proper body function requires replenishment of the water supply by consuming beverages and foods that contain water. Massage may cause a person to perspire, and the movement of blood through the tissues may cause an increase in toxins that need elimination. Research is needed to confirm this theory, but massage therapists base their recommendations on the bodyвs daily need for water and its importance in the proper functioning of the body. Daily water recommendations vary from different sources. MayoClinic. com says three strategies are common: replacing the amount of water lost based on urine output, drinking eight 8 oz. glasses of water per day, or consuming a specified amount–roughly 0. 75 gallons for men and a little more than a half-gallon for women. The American Massage Therapy Association has created several position statements on the benefits of massage therapy, ranging from pain reduction to overall improvements in health and wellness. It is not clear what role water plays in the overall massage process, but it is important to replenish the bodyвs water supply. Massage can help with stress reduction and pain complaints for many people. Drinking water is healthy, and until research identifies the exact mechanism of massage and waterвs effect on the body, it is still a good idea to drink water daily to supplement the normal loss of body fluids.
in, May 5, 2017 Make sure to drink plenty of water after a massage to flush out all the toxins.

\"\"

In massage school I was taught that massage worked the trapped lactic acid and other toxins out of your muscles and that we needed to drink lots of water afterward to flush it all out of the body so that we wouldn t hurt the next day. I was also taught that lactic acid is made by the body when our muscles are running low on oxygen, and that by the time we finish panting after heavy exercise, it s all been converted back to the basic building blocks from whence it came. For some reason, the impossibility of thosePtwo concepts both being true didn t occur to me until several years after I graduated from massage school. Ok, this mythPis persistent, and it has to stop. Exercise physiologists have known for decades that lactic acid is fuel for the body, not a toxin. When our oxygen supply drops, as it does during strenuous exercise, our body converts glycogen to lactic acid and uses that as an energy or fuel source. Lactic acid doesn t actually cause muscles to fatigue during exercise or any other time. On the contrary, it actually delays the onset of muscle fatigue which prevents you from hurting as bad as you otherwise would. When you stop exercising, your liver converts any leftover lactic acid back to glycogen. Say it after me Lactic acid does not make me hurt. It gives me energy. It does not get trapped in my muscles.

\"\"

Have you ever asked someone what toxins are trapped in our muscles? I have. So far, no one s been able to give me a satisfactory answer. Usually they mumble something about lactic acid (see above) and other metabolic wastes. When I ask which metabolic wastes, I get a bunch of non-answers like all kinds of them. Really? That s the best you ve got for me? I m gonna give you a quick anatomy and physiology lesson today. I promise it won t hurt Much. This is gonna be the anatomy version of tl;dr (too long; didn t read). You have blood vessels running through your entire body. Some are positively huge, like your aorta, others are very small, like your capillaries, and the rest, your arteries and veins for instance, are somewhere in between. Half of your blood vessels bring nutrients to your organs, muscle, and other tissues, and the other half remove the metabolic waste products that are left behind when your body s done using the nutrients. One of the nutrients they bring around to all parts of your body is oxygen, and one of the waste products they remove is carbon dioxide. Without oxygen, your tissues will die; this includes your muscles. If one your muscles is too tight to allow the blood to flow through it enough to remove carbon dioxide, it sPalso too tight to allow the blood to bring in oxygen, and your muscle will die. Once those metabolic waste products are in your blood, they travel through the body until they get to either the liver or the kidneys, where they are pulled out by one of those organs.

\"\"

If it s pulled out by your kidneys, it will be eliminated from your body via your urine. If it s pulled out by the liver, it gets further metabolized and may be converted into something useful. It also may be Pconverted into something the kidneys deal with, in which case it s released back into the bloodstream where it s transported to the kidneys to be eliminated in your urine. So, if your muscle hasn t died and your liver and kidneys are in proper working order, you don t have to worry about toxins building up in your muscles. Repeat after me There are no toxins to flush from my muscles unless my liver and kidneys aren t working the wayPthey should. The real reason you should drink water after a massage is because muscles work and feel best when they re fully hydrated. If you re like the vast majority of Americans, you re in no danger of accidentally killing yourself via overhydration anytime soon, so it won t hurt you to drink a little water after your massage if you want. My doctor once toldPme that one sure fire way to tell if you need to drink more water is by the color of your urine. If it s very pale yellow, you re probably fine; any darker than that, however, and you need to drink more water. So, to sum up (tl;dr for real): You do not need to drink water after a massage to flush lactic acid or toxins from your body. You should drink it to make sure your muscles are fully hydrated because they feel and work their best when they are.

Show More

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button
Close