why do we color easter eggs and hide them

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and have become integral to the celebration of today. However, the tradition of painting hard-boiled eggs during springtime pre-dates Christianity. In many cultures around the world, the egg is a symbol of new life, fertility and rebirth. For thousands of years, Iranians and others have decorated eggs on, the Iranian New Year that falls on the spring equinox. Some claim that the Easter egg has pagan roots. Before Christians celebrated the resurrection of Jesus, some argue ancient pagans in Europe as the return of the sun God — a rebirth of light and an emergence from the lean winter. Some also point to the Venerable Bede, an English monk who wrote the first history of Christianity in England, for evidence of this connection. Bede argued that even derived from a pagan fertility goddess named \”Eostre\” in English and Germanic cultures. Scholars have since noted that there is little to no evidence of such a goddess outside of Bede\’s writings.

Also, in most other languages the word for Easter — Pascua in Spanish and Pasques in French, for instance — from the Greek and Latin Pascha or Pasch, for Passover. For Christians, the Easter egg is symbolic of the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Painting Easter eggs is an especially beloved tradition in the Orthodox and Eastern Catholic churches where the to represent the blood of Jesus Christ that was shed on the cross. Easter eggs are blessed by the priest at the end of the Paschal vigil and distributed to the congregants. The hard shell of the egg represents the sealed Tomb of Christ, and cracking the shell represents Jesus\’ resurrection from the dead. Moreover, historically Christians would abstain from eating eggs and meat during, and Easter was the first chance to eat eggs after a long period of abstinence. (Orthodox Christians continue to abstain from eggs during Lent. ) Easter egg hunts and egg rolling are two popular egg-related traditions.

An egg hunt involves hiding eggs outside for children to run around and find on Easter morning. Eggs are rolled as a symbolic re-enactment of the rolling away of the stone from ChristŠ‘s tomb. In the United States, the is an annual event that is held on the White House lawn each Monday after Easter. Check out these beautifully painted Easter Eggs! Many of you may be enjoying eating Easter chocolate this weekend, but where does this tradition come from? Easter is a Christian festival that celebrates the resurrection of Jesus Christ. The Bible says that Christ died on the cross on a day called Good Friday, which this year falls on 30 March. Then he resurrected and came back to life on Easter Sunday. This is the most important day in the Christian calendar. Easter is on different dates each year, between 21 March and 25 April, depending on when there\’s a full moon in Spring.

Many Christians will spend time at church in thought, prayer and celebration of Jesus Christ\’s life, and may get together with friends and family for a special meal. There are also some more modern traditions to mark Easter which are very common – such as Easter eggs, the Easter bunny and chocolate. But where do these modern traditions come from? Why do we have Easter eggs? A lot of us may chomp on chocolate eggs at Easter, but originally eating eggs was not allowed by church leaders during the week leading up to Easter (known as Holy Week). So any eggs laid that week were saved and decorated to make them Holy Week eggs, that were then given to children as gifts. Victorians adapted the tradition with satin-covered cardboard eggs filled with Easter gifts. This has now developed into the tradition that many people enjoy today.

Why are Easter eggs made of chocolate? The first chocolate eggs appeared in France and Germany in the 19th Century, but they were bitter and hard. As chocolate-making techniques improved, hollow eggs like the ones we have today were developed. They very quickly became popular and remain a favourite tradition with chocolate-lovers today. What\’s the Easter Bunny then? The story of the Easter Bunny is thought to have become common in the 19th Century. Rabbits usually give birth to a big litter of babies (called kittens), so they became a symbol of new life. Legend has it that the Easter bunny lays, decorates and hides eggs as they are also a symbol of new life. This is why some children might enjoy Easter egg hunts as part of the festival. It doesn\’t do all the work alone though! In Switzerland, Easter eggs are delivered by a cuckoo and in parts of Germany by a fox.

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